Sports Medicine: Exercising With Lower Back Pain: Prescription for Health


Sports Medicine – Exercise is medicine!

Back pain is one of the most common medical complaints in the world. Don’t let low back pain get you down! A well-designed exercise program can help speed recovery from low back pain, reduce pain levels, and possibly prevent reinjury. In fact, regular physical activity has been shown to increase muscle strength and endurance, enhance mobility and reduce the risk of falling is superior to spine therapy at helping people cope with back pain and at keeping it under control! The key to maximizing the benefits of exercise is to follow a well-designed program that you can stick to over the long-term.

Getting Started

The goal of exercise training is to improve overall fitness (cardiovascular, muscle strength and endurance, flexibility, coordination and function).

Talk with your health care provider before starting an exercise program and ask if they have specific concerns about you doing exercise. Most people do very well with regular exercise and sufficient time, but some people do need surgery.

The goal of exercise training is to improve overall fitness (cardiovascular, muscle strength and endurance, flexibility, coordination and function) while minimizing the stress to the lower back.

Choose low-impact activities, such as walking, swimming, and cycling.

Strong abdominals, back, and leg muscles are essential for helping you maintain good posture and body mechanics. Once the acute pain subsides, you can begin doing light strengthening-training exercises designed to help your posture.

Yoga and tai chi may help relieve or prevent lower back pain by increasing flexibility and reducing tension. Be careful, however, not to do any poses that could exacerbate your condition.

Start slowly and gradually progress the intensity and duration of your workouts.

Do low- to moderate-intensity cardiovascular exercise for 20 to 60 minutes at least three to four days per week.

Exercise Cautions

Avoid high-impact activities such as running.

While low-impact aerobic activities can be started within two weeks of the onset of lower back pain, exercises that target the trunk region should be delayed until at least two weeks after the first sign of symptoms.

Never exercise to the point of pain — if something hurts, don’t do it.

Your exercise program should be designed to maximize the benefits with the fewest risks of aggravating your health or physical condition. Consider contacting us here at Dynamic Osteopaths to cover realistic goals and design a safe and effective program that addresses your specific needs.

For more information, visit us at Dynamic Osteopaths in Solihull and Birmingham at http://www.dynamicosteopaths.com or email us at info@dynamicosteopaths.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s