Diet or exercise? ‘Energy balance’ real key to disease prevention


Article from: Science Daily

A majority of individuals are overweight or obese, a factor in the rapid rise in common diseases like diabetes, heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure and more. According to research, energy balance is a viable public health solution to address the obesity epidemic. A new paper outlines steps to incorporate energy balance principles into public health outreach in the U.S.

Follow link for full article
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140625114630.htm

Further information on diet, fitness and exercise can be found at www.dynamicosteopaths.com

Living Well with Osteoarthritis: A guide to keeping your joints healthy


Review from Harvard Medical School:

Arthritis can be distracting. Distressing. And disheartening. It can make you hesitant. It can frustrate — and even prevent — you from doing all the things you love to do. It is, quite literally, a pain.

The good news is that you can live — and live well — with osteoarthritis, the most common type of arthritis. You can get relief from its pain and its consequences.

Don’t let arthritis pain get in your way!

End the relentless aches and aggravation and start enjoying a more active and pain-free life once again!

The report will brief you on breakthroughs in joint replacement surgery. Do you want to learn about the role of physical therapy as well as complementary procedures. And because medications remain the first line of defense, the report examines the effectiveness, safety, and possible side effects of more than 40 medications used to treat arthritis and relieve its pain.

Self-care strategies for coping with arthritis: Exercise

Even the healthiest people find it difficult to stick with an exercise regimen. But those with arthritis commonly discover that if they don’t exercise regularly, they’ll pay the price in pain, stiffness, and fatigue. Regular exercise not only helps maintain joint function, but also relieves stiffness and decreases pain and fatigue. Feeling tired may be partly the result of inflammation and medications, but it’s also caused by muscle weakness and poor stamina. If a muscle isn’t used, it can lose 3% of its function every day and 30% of its bulk in just a week. A recent review of numerouse studies asserts that both aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercises are safe and effective for people with chronic arthritis. Below are brief summaries of different forms of structured exercise programs (most of which are offered by local Arthritis Foundation chapters) and their potential benefits.

Land-based programs. These include community-based group classes led by health or fitness professionals with specialized training in instructing people with arthritis. Examples include Fit and Strong!, a program targeted to older adults with osteoarthritis; the Arthritis Foundation’s Exercise Program (AFEP); and its Walk with Ease program. All include some combination of a warm-up routine and three standard exercise goals, plus specialized activities to enhance body awareness, balance, and coordination. Studies have found that people with arthritis in their hips, legs, and feet who took Fit and Strong! classes were able to exercise longer, felt more confident about their ability to exercise, and reported less joint stiffness compared with those in a control group. Many of the benefits lasted between six and 12 months. Those attending AFEP classes for eight weeks had less pain, stiffness, and fatigue, and these improvements persisted at least six months, as well. In one study, people who completed the Walk with Ease program (which also teaches participants about managing their disease) had more confidence, less depression, and less pain, compared with participants who attended classes focused on pain management.

Water-based programs. Also known as aquatic or pool therapy, these group classes are done in water that’s nearly 90° F and feature a variety of exercises, including range-of-motion exercises and aerobics. According to one study, people who took the Arthritis Foundation Aquatic Program improved knee and hip flexibility, as well as strength and aerobic fitness. Other investigations suggest water exercise lessens pain and boosts physical functioning, and the benefits after the 12-week session were sustained for three months after the last class.

Strength and resistance training. This form of exercise, which uses equipment such as weight machines, free weights, and resistance bands or tubing, strengthens not only muscles but also your bones and your cardiovascular system. Resistance training improves muscle strength, physical functioning, and pain. One Japanese study compared people with knee osteoarthritis who either took NSAIDs or did twice daily knee extension exercises to strengthen their quadriceps (the muscles on the front of the thigh). At the end of the eight-week study, both groups had less pain and stiffness, as well as improved functioning and quality of life.

Tai chi. With origins in Chinese martial arts, this low-impact, slow-motion exercise also emphasizes breathing and mental focus. A number of small studies suggest tai chi helps people with different forms of arthritis, mainly by increasing flexibility and improving muscle strength in the lower body, as well as aiding gait and balance. The Arthritis Foundation, along with Dr. Paul Lam, a family physician and tai chi instructor, developed a standardized form of tai chi designed specifically for people with arthritis. Based on Sun-style tai chi, one of the discipline’s five major recognized styles, it includes agile steps and a high stance (meaning the legs bend only slightly).

Yoga. Scant research has explored the benefits of yoga for people with arthritis. One study showed that people with knee osteoarthritis who took eight weeks of Iyengar yoga (a form of yoga that focuses on correct body alignment, and uses blocks, belts, and other props to assist in performing postures) had less pain and could function better at the end of the study. Another study of people with rheumatoid arthritis found benefits from participating in twice-weekly Iyengar sessions for six weeks — namely, less pain and depression and greater mobility. But both studies were quite small, and neither included a comparison group.

For further information please visit Dynamic Osteopaths or contact us at info@dynamicosteopaths.com

Scientists unravel the molecular secret of short, intense workouts

Scientists unravel the molecular secret of short, intense workouts


Sports Medicine: Fitness. Link Sports Med: Fitness

In the last few years, the benefits of short, intense workouts have been extolled by both researchers and exercise fans as something of a metabolic panacea capable of providing greater overall fitness, better blood sugar control and weight reduction – all of it in periods as short as seven minutes a few times a week.

Now, in a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) confirm that there is something molecularly unique about intense exercise: the activation of a single protein.

The study, published recently by The EMBO Journal, revealed the effects of a protein known as CRTC2.

The scientists were able to show that following high-intensity exercise, which enlists the sympathetic nervous system’s “fight or flight” response, CRTC2 integrates signals from two different pathways – the adrenaline pathway and the calcium pathway, to direct muscle adaptation and growth only in the contracting muscle.

Using mice genetically modified to conditionally express CRTC2, the scientists showed that molecular changes occurred that emulated exercised muscles in the absence of exercise.

“The sympathetic nervous system gets turned on during intense exercise, but many had believed it wasn’t specific enough to drive specific adaptations in exercised muscle,” said Michael Conkright, PhD, a TSRI assistant professor who led the study. “Our findings show that not only does it target those specific muscles, but it improves them – the long-term benefits correlate with the intensity of the workout.”

Mobilizing Resources

In the genetically altered animal models, this resulted in a muscle size increase of approximately 15 percent. Metabolic parameters, indicating the amount of fuel available to the muscles, also increased substantially – triglycerides went up 48 percent, while glycogen supplies rose by a startling 121 percent.

In an exercise stress test, the genetically altered animals improved 103 percent after the gene was activated, compared to an 8.5-percent improvement in normal animals.

“If you think of the adrenaline system as something that mobilizes resources when you encounter, say, a bear on your way to work, what we found is that the system also gets you ready for your next bear encounter,” Conkright said.

The new findings open the door to a range of potential exercise enhancements.

“Nothing can supplant exercise; however, just by activating one protein, we clearly improved performance in animal models,” said Staff Scientist Nelson E. Bruno, MD, PhD, the first author of the study and a member of the Conkright laboratory. “We are now searching for molecular therapeutics that will activate the CRTC2 protein so that even an average exercise routine could potentially be enhanced and made more beneficial.”

Further information can be found at Dynamic Osteopaths or by contacting info@dynamicosteopaths.com

The importance of regular exercise and chronic pain – osteopathic perspective.


Regular exercise has many benefits, not just for general fitness, but also for people who may be suffering from ongoing chronic pain, within the spine and the joints. Evidence identifies how keeping yourself active and exercising regularly provides huge benefits for you joints – keeping then well lubricated which in turn reduces stiffness and pain, at the same time as keeping your muscles active and strong, which enables your joints to be more stable and better at dealing with dynamic properties.

Dynamic Osteopaths are traditional osteopaths with strong backgrounds in sports medicine, that see patients on a daily basis who are dealing with the difficulties of chronic pain. Here at Dynamic Osteopaths we treat such musculoskeletal conditions by providing spinal and muscular osteopathic treatment, specifically aimed at reducing pain and promoting individual function, enabling regular bouts of exercise to continue. Here, our osteopaths will provide full support of specific stretches and exercises to help enhance mobility and strengthen problematic areas. The sports osteopath, who is an exercise specialist will recommend how many times a week exercise and will educate you on why these exercises are important to prevent injury.

Here at Dynamic Osteopaths, we have operating clinics within Henley In Arden, Solihull and Harborne Birmingham, where we provide comprehensive treatment and support for chronic pain suffers.

For further information, feel free to contact us on 0121 472 1268 or visit our website at www.dynamicosteopaths.com to find out further information.